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? Rhetorica Sleepless Scribe
posts: 1244
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
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Fair question. The motivation behind <dt> was partly one of visual aesthetics; the prototypical word (and most frequent cause of use) is the highly productive suffix -idt- (/ɪɾ/), "point," which is responsible for the /ɾ/ in vêdt-. I wanted to do something that wasn't painfully unoriginal with the standard transliteration, which has a pretty obvious bias toward English. The particular form has two bases: <dt> represents an easy English mnemonic for how to pronounce the letter, since the vast majority of native speakers will only use an alveolar tap in the place of a "t", and it's often transcribed as "dd" in such cases, e.g. "wadder" for "water." <dd> and <tt> are both legal in Lilitika, but adjacent consonants with different voicing must be separated by a vowel.

Secondly, perhaps more importantly, /ɾ/ generally behaves like a partly lenited third alveolar plosive in Lilitika, and has few if any situations where it shows a clear relationship with the liquids, /w j l ɹ/ <w y l r>. So, having any hint of <r> in the orthography would confuse this. For similar reasons, when I decided <gh> /ɣ/ would evolve into /ʁ/ in later chronolects (admittedly not much of a difference) I gave it a new grapheme, <q>. (The same era also saw a number of alveolar consonants shift toward palatal forms, which had the unfortunate effect of making the Lilitai sound like they were hearing impaired.)

I've thought a fair bit about input devices, and my conclusion is mixed. On their own, the Lilitai would probably develop pen-based input for written language, but thousands of years of Ksreskézaian innovation and ergonomics is more conducive to a gripped interface, where the letters are typed in tachygraphic/stenotype chords, like a keyer wrapped around a joystick or handlebar.

However, as one of the key themes in the setting is that, despite being set half a million years in the future, human civilization has never experienced a dark age so severe that it lost all access to its history, some relics of the ancient past were never, ever replaced. The scientific language is still formal Modern English, much like Latin was the scientific language of the 19th Century. This is largely a matter of practicality, but it is also a part of a larger trend toward reverence for the dawn of civilization, one practically unique in the cosmos because it was never followed by a sunset. Terraphiles—not all of them descendants of Terrans—partake of media from that era, much as Classics departments today still put on ancient Greek and Roman plays. Most of them are just casually interested in the subject—but some go through a "phase" of terramania, some are just interested because it's the latest craze, and a very small number of individuals turn into TV-obsessed hermits, watching recordings of 24-hour news channels for years at a time, with commercial breaks intact. (At that point, friends usually stage an intervention.)

With this in mind, while the Lilitai may not have traditional keyboards themselves, it is almost certain that after they rejoined humanity, there was someone nearby with a QWERTY keyboard not much different from yours, and someone else who has just realized the first person has a QWERTY keyboard and is now looking extremely smug, because theirs is a Dvorak.
in thread: Pretty Scripties Showcase Thread
? Hālian :(
posts: 124
, Atetía @ Central Florida
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I don't think it's really that necessary to mark stress. (see also: Cyrillic) Also, on the subject of Lilitika, why <dt> for /ɾ/?

*also imagines a Lilitika keyboard layout even though physical keyboards are likely relics to them*
in thread: Pretty Scripties Showcase Thread
? Hālian :(
posts: 124
, Atetía @ Central Florida
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The major problem for designing Hoennese currency is finding art of Pokémon that is both suitable and available for this use.
in thread: Money Thread
? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 50
, Boson, Luxembourg, LUX
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quoting Izambri, Duke, the Findible League:
quoting Hālian, Atetía @ Central Florida:
Your money is too beautiful for this world, how do you not have a job designing money irl

(Also I've been trying to design Hoennese coinage but drawing a blank as to obverse designs… doesn't help that I can't draw anything more complicated than simple geometric shapes myself, either vector or raster.)

Drawing fantasy money (coins and banknotes) is quite easy once you now where to fish textures and images and how to work with them. In the first case Rhetorica and bloodbath have already pointed out the basic places: Wikimedia Commons, OpenClipart... Doing extensive searchs through Google Images also helps a lot, especially for gradations, uncommon geometric shapes and other textures.

Then working them shouldn't be a big problem: I use Paint.NET, a free software, but more complex things like Gimp or Photoshop are also a possibility. To be honest, you really don't need something very professional, since playing with basic tools like gradient, magic wands and layers is practically all you need. The most important thing of all, in my opinion, is to have a clear idea of what you want to do, no matter if it's too close to real coins and banknotes or a more deviant design.

This is exactly what I recommend: find a good software that you're comfortable using and work with it. Paint.NET is my go-to, but nowadays I use a combination of Inkscape for lettering and some of the text effects and Paint.NET for the actual assembly. Have an idea of what you want to do, but also don't be afraid to try!


quoting Izambri, Duke, the Findible League:
The next series of banknotes (which I'll do some day...) will be more refined. And so on. It's all about trying to do it, failing at it, and repeating.

Bingo. I've been making banknotes for 10+ (!) years, and I've only gotten semi-good at it because of a lot of practice and a lot of designs that looked hideous. Took me about 5 years to get comfortable with the process, and I'm still learning new things.
in thread: Money Thread
? Izambri Left of the middle
posts: 898
, Duke, the Findible League
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quoting Hālian, Atetía @ Central Florida:
Your money is too beautiful for this world, how do you not have a job designing money irl

(Also I've been trying to design Hoennese coinage but drawing a blank as to obverse designs… doesn't help that I can't draw anything more complicated than simple geometric shapes myself, either vector or raster.)

Drawing fantasy money (coins and banknotes) is quite easy once you now where to fish textures and images and how to work with them. In the first case Rhetorica and bloodbath have already pointed out the basic places: Wikimedia Commons, OpenClipart... Doing extensive searchs through Google Images also helps a lot, especially for gradations, uncommon geometric shapes and other textures.

Then working them shouldn't be a big problem: I use Paint.NET, a free software, but more complex things like Gimp or Photoshop are also a possibility. To be honest, you really don't need something very professional, since playing with basic tools like gradient, magic wands and layers is practically all you need. The most important thing of all, in my opinion, is to have a clear idea of what you want to do, no matter if it's too close to real coins and banknotes or a more deviant design.

Take as an example the first banknote I ever designed, a 5 aras note:

tumblr_m8iiny8qyX1rd9fsko1_r1_500.png

Not very sophisticated. The use of textures is practically non-existent, since I only used some superimposed geometric patterns (and very simple: distorted lines), but it was a first step. The image is treated as a separate layer with some diminished opacity, to melt it with the background, and the rest is just opaque images (the central vertical strip and the numbers and letters). What took more time and patience was the right strip, which has a pattern of iridescent shapes and numbers, but even that wasn't a pain.
    The next series of banknotes (which I'll do some day...) will be more refined. And so on. It's all about trying to do it, failing at it, and repeating.
in thread: Money Thread
? Rhetorica Sleepless Scribe
posts: 1244
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
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That's an oversight. It's <ú>, which is just /uː/. Within Lilitika's tense-lax system, /uː iː eː/ <ú í é> are paired with /ʌ ɪ ɛ/ <u i e>. Usually the accent of a word has to fall on a tense vowel, with the unpaired /oː/ <o> also counting as tense and the unpaired /a/ <a> counting as lax. Designating where stress falls in a word—especially if it happens to be on a short vowel, as is the case in certain verb forms of the Illeran dialect—got to be such a headache that I developed a Greek "Hellenic" transliteration that still required numerous digraphs even after adding in several Coptic letters.

The three other vowels (/ɒ yː ɔː/ <ô ê û>) are used almost exclusively in interjections and a few modern loanwords, although <ê> does appear in a few roots: <bosêt-> (/boːsyːt/), "luxury," and <vêdt->  (/vyːɾ/ or /vøːɾ/), "precision." It might be a fossilized imitation of a prestigious sociolect.
in thread: Pretty Scripties Showcase Thread
? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 50
, Boson, Luxembourg, LUX
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quoting Rhetorica, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1:
Try something like Public Domain Vectors or OpenClipart, especially the woodcuts section thereof. I'd be surprised (impressed, but still surprised) if Bloodbath's work is completely from scratch, particularly all the photographed bits.

I do use some line art drawings from Wikimedia Commons, mostly for the flowers (since getting good floral images is difficult), and the photographs of locations are either 90% or 100% taken by yours truly, but I do process the images myself, and all of the Moiré patterns and underprints I also do myself (except for the Guilloche patterns, which I make using an online tool. But processing the images isn't too bad: you make them generally monochrome, then you eliminate the white areas. The result can then be colored as desired.

quoting Rhetorica, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1:
vigla-sarthia.png
Here's an example of early Lilitic currency (with yet another new script!), a 58 mm × 23 mm × 8.3 mm metal bar (similar to a slip of gold-pressed Latinum, really.) As I've mentioned in the distant, foggy past, the Lilitai back their money directly with labour, and issue a single denomination, typically worth a day's work. These are called viglai (sg. vigla, literally "promise") and are issued by the individual who will carry out the work. The bars are cast in an alloy of lead, antimony, and tin at a central mint. The designs are made using a personal coin mold, and include the issuer's name; the molds also generally function as a sort of signet ring, or even an ink stamp, that can be worn as a pendant.

The vigla market is almost uniquely variable, and in many ways resembles a bond market. The viglai of the famous are highly prized, but so too are the viglai of the highly industrious and reliable; failing to honour an agreement paid for with vigla has obvious and serious consequences for the issuer's social credit rating. However, as viglai can always be bought back and taken out of circulation, there is also an obvious imperative to minimize risk by only issuing money in one's name when necessary—otherwise, one's rivals or enemies may end up with the power to make uncomfortable (but not unreasonable) requests.

Much has been made of defining what can fairly be asked of the issuer when redeeming a vigla, and there many laws, taboos, and etiquette pertaining to the subject. On more than one occasion, an individual's credit rating has emerged unscathed after refusing work because it was sought in bad faith, or by a pariah.

Very cool idea, and very nice design. The system's almost a bit like how banknotes somewhat traditionally worked, with trust being the main backing of the instrument. Seems a small bit impractical to issue it in day units, though...

quoting Hālian, Atetía @ Central Florida:
Your money is too beautiful for this world, how do you not have a job designing money irl

(Also I've been trying to design Hoennese coinage but drawing a blank as to obverse designs… doesn't help that I can't draw anything more complicated than simple geometric shapes myself, either vector or raster.)

Haven't had an opportunity, plus I like other things equally. (Like Science.)

As for coin designs, like Rhetorica said, art isn't necessary. Also, use inspiration from real life! There are loads of currencies out there, each of which (often) uses a different design for the coinage. That's actually one of the ways I got good at banknote design: I look at lots of banknotes issued throughout the world and use those as bases on which I design mine. For example, Ilian coins are somewhat based off the old Belgian Franc coins mixed with the pre-2008 Sterling coins. Similarly, Ilian banknotes are I think largely from Serbian dinar, Bulgarian lev, and the old Belgian franc notes.
in thread: Money Thread
? Izambri Left of the middle
posts: 898
, Duke, the Findible League
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What does the accent on that <ú> stand for? Tonic vowel?
in thread: Pretty Scripties Showcase Thread
? Rhetorica Sleepless Scribe
posts: 1244
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
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The script used in this Money Thread post:

talmota-wip.png

This has a very simple ductus; the oval nib is consistent throughout the script. As is obvious, I was aiming to riff on Semitic abjads, particularly Arabic.
in thread: Pretty Scripties Showcase Thread
? Rhetorica Sleepless Scribe
posts: 1244
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
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...Of course, I say that, and then promptly discover those particular sources are somewhat crap. Still, the idea stands?

vigla-sarthia.png
Here's an example of early Lilitic currency (with yet another new script!), a 58 mm × 23 mm × 8.3 mm metal bar (similar to a slip of gold-pressed Latinum, really.) As I've mentioned in the distant, foggy past, the Lilitai back their money directly with labour, and issue a single denomination, typically worth a day's work. These are called viglai (sg. vigla, literally "promise") and are issued by the individual who will carry out the work. The bars are cast in an alloy of lead, antimony, and tin at a central mint. The designs are made using a personal coin mold, and include the issuer's name; the molds also generally function as a sort of signet ring, or even an ink stamp, that can be worn as a pendant.

The vigla market is almost uniquely variable, and in many ways resembles a bond market. The viglai of the famous are highly prized, but so too are the viglai of the highly industrious and reliable; failing to honour an agreement paid for with vigla has obvious and serious consequences for the issuer's social credit rating. However, as viglai can always be bought back and taken out of circulation, there is also an obvious imperative to minimize risk by only issuing money in one's name when necessary—otherwise, one's rivals or enemies may end up with the power to make uncomfortable (but not unreasonable) requests.

Much has been made of defining what can fairly be asked of the issuer when redeeming a vigla, and there many laws, taboos, and etiquette pertaining to the subject. On more than one occasion, an individual's credit rating has emerged unscathed after refusing work because it was sought in bad faith, or by a pariah.
in thread: Money Thread