Money Thread
Anthologica Universe Atlas / Forums / Department of Creativity / Money Thread

? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 51
, Boson message
I figured that a dedicated thread for the most important 5-letter word of all (MONEY) might be a nice thing. Hence, here's a place for showing off some of your monetary creations for your conworlds and the like, especially if it's/they're quite different in structure from most "modern" financial systems.

Anyways, of course, with me starting, I have a few recent-ish things to share:
telemor_50_franc_note__2018_by_requindes
Telèmor 50 franc (~USD 65)
telemor_100_franc_note__2018_version_by_
Telèmor 100 franc (~USD 130)
yjd_250_by_requindesang-dcdg26r.png
Ilian 250 dénar (~USD 6)
yjd_10000_by_requindesang-dck7db2.png
Ilian 10000 dénar (~USD 240)
oshaharu_money_fan_by_requindesang-dbgk5
Oshaharu currency: pyéw, divided into 20 . Official rate is OSP 0.85 (17 ) per Telèmor franc, but the black market rate is quite different. (Closer to OSP 28-30 per franc.)
? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 51
, Boson, Luxembourg, LUX
message
OMG MORE MONEY
Maybe we can seed this thread with more money:
ilian_coins__v__3_0_by_requindesang_dd1r
Ilian dénar coins, ranging from YJD 0.10 (~USD 0.002) to YJD 25 (~USD 0.50). The most commonly used are the 1, 10, and 25 dénar.
? Rhetorica Your Writing System Sucks
posts: 1258
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
message
What's the difference between "dénare" and "dénarak"? Does the language have a special paucal form specifically for ten of something?
? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 51
, Boson, Luxembourg, LUX
message
quoting Rhetorica, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1:
What's the difference between "dénare" and "dénarak"? Does the language have a special paucal form specifically for ten of something?

Ilian actually has four plural suffixes:
  • –y/–i, used for the dual (ex. kéty dénary) or for numbers ending with 2 (ex. hésankéty dénary)
  • –e/–u, used for the paucal (3, 4, or 5; ex. harãje dénare) or any numbers ending with 3, 4, or 5
  • –k/–ák/–ók, used for plurals ending with 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10 (ex. týcák dénarák)
  • –t/–át/–ót, which is used for a plural of unknown quantity (ex. cĩmolót, the people)
? Hālian :(
posts: 129
, Alípteza @ Central Florida
message
Your money is too beautiful for this world, how do you not have a job designing money irl

(Also I've been trying to design Hoennese coinage but drawing a blank as to obverse designs… doesn't help that I can't draw anything more complicated than simple geometric shapes myself, either vector or raster.)
? Rhetorica Your Writing System Sucks
posts: 1258
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
message
Try something like Public Domain Vectors or OpenClipart, especially the woodcuts section thereof. I'd be surprised (impressed, but still surprised) if Bloodbath's work is completely from scratch, particularly all the photographed bits.
? Rhetorica Your Writing System Sucks
posts: 1258
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
message
...Of course, I say that, and then promptly discover those particular sources are somewhat crap. Still, the idea stands?

vigla-sarthia.png
Here's an example of early Lilitic currency (with yet another new script!), a 58 mm × 23 mm × 8.3 mm metal bar (similar to a slip of gold-pressed Latinum, really.) As I've mentioned in the distant, foggy past, the Lilitai back their money directly with labour, and issue a single denomination, typically worth a day's work. These are called viglai (sg. vigla, literally "promise") and are issued by the individual who will carry out the work. The bars are cast in an alloy of lead, antimony, and tin at a central mint. The designs are made using a personal coin mold, and include the issuer's name; the molds also generally function as a sort of signet ring, or even an ink stamp, that can be worn as a pendant.

The vigla market is almost uniquely variable, and in many ways resembles a bond market. The viglai of the famous are highly prized, but so too are the viglai of the highly industrious and reliable; failing to honour an agreement paid for with vigla has obvious and serious consequences for the issuer's social credit rating. However, as viglai can always be bought back and taken out of circulation, there is also an obvious imperative to minimize risk by only issuing money in one's name when necessary—otherwise, one's rivals or enemies may end up with the power to make uncomfortable (but not unreasonable) requests.

Much has been made of defining what can fairly be asked of the issuer when redeeming a vigla, and there many laws, taboos, and etiquette pertaining to the subject. On more than one occasion, an individual's credit rating has emerged unscathed after refusing work because it was sought in bad faith, or by a pariah.
? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 51
, Boson, Luxembourg, LUX
message
quoting Rhetorica, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1:
Try something like Public Domain Vectors or OpenClipart, especially the woodcuts section thereof. I'd be surprised (impressed, but still surprised) if Bloodbath's work is completely from scratch, particularly all the photographed bits.

I do use some line art drawings from Wikimedia Commons, mostly for the flowers (since getting good floral images is difficult), and the photographs of locations are either 90% or 100% taken by yours truly, but I do process the images myself, and all of the Moiré patterns and underprints I also do myself (except for the Guilloche patterns, which I make using an online tool. But processing the images isn't too bad: you make them generally monochrome, then you eliminate the white areas. The result can then be colored as desired.

quoting Rhetorica, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1:
vigla-sarthia.png
Here's an example of early Lilitic currency (with yet another new script!), a 58 mm × 23 mm × 8.3 mm metal bar (similar to a slip of gold-pressed Latinum, really.) As I've mentioned in the distant, foggy past, the Lilitai back their money directly with labour, and issue a single denomination, typically worth a day's work. These are called viglai (sg. vigla, literally "promise") and are issued by the individual who will carry out the work. The bars are cast in an alloy of lead, antimony, and tin at a central mint. The designs are made using a personal coin mold, and include the issuer's name; the molds also generally function as a sort of signet ring, or even an ink stamp, that can be worn as a pendant.

The vigla market is almost uniquely variable, and in many ways resembles a bond market. The viglai of the famous are highly prized, but so too are the viglai of the highly industrious and reliable; failing to honour an agreement paid for with vigla has obvious and serious consequences for the issuer's social credit rating. However, as viglai can always be bought back and taken out of circulation, there is also an obvious imperative to minimize risk by only issuing money in one's name when necessary—otherwise, one's rivals or enemies may end up with the power to make uncomfortable (but not unreasonable) requests.

Much has been made of defining what can fairly be asked of the issuer when redeeming a vigla, and there many laws, taboos, and etiquette pertaining to the subject. On more than one occasion, an individual's credit rating has emerged unscathed after refusing work because it was sought in bad faith, or by a pariah.

Very cool idea, and very nice design. The system's almost a bit like how banknotes somewhat traditionally worked, with trust being the main backing of the instrument. Seems a small bit impractical to issue it in day units, though...

quoting Hālian, Atetía @ Central Florida:
Your money is too beautiful for this world, how do you not have a job designing money irl

(Also I've been trying to design Hoennese coinage but drawing a blank as to obverse designs… doesn't help that I can't draw anything more complicated than simple geometric shapes myself, either vector or raster.)

Haven't had an opportunity, plus I like other things equally. (Like Science.)

As for coin designs, like Rhetorica said, art isn't necessary. Also, use inspiration from real life! There are loads of currencies out there, each of which (often) uses a different design for the coinage. That's actually one of the ways I got good at banknote design: I look at lots of banknotes issued throughout the world and use those as bases on which I design mine. For example, Ilian coins are somewhat based off the old Belgian Franc coins mixed with the pre-2008 Sterling coins. Similarly, Ilian banknotes are I think largely from Serbian dinar, Bulgarian lev, and the old Belgian franc notes.
? Izambri Left of the middle
posts: 904
, Duke, the Findible League
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quoting Hālian, Atetía @ Central Florida:
Your money is too beautiful for this world, how do you not have a job designing money irl

(Also I've been trying to design Hoennese coinage but drawing a blank as to obverse designs… doesn't help that I can't draw anything more complicated than simple geometric shapes myself, either vector or raster.)

Drawing fantasy money (coins and banknotes) is quite easy once you now where to fish textures and images and how to work with them. In the first case Rhetorica and bloodbath have already pointed out the basic places: Wikimedia Commons, OpenClipart... Doing extensive searchs through Google Images also helps a lot, especially for gradations, uncommon geometric shapes and other textures.

Then working them shouldn't be a big problem: I use Paint.NET, a free software, but more complex things like Gimp or Photoshop are also a possibility. To be honest, you really don't need something very professional, since playing with basic tools like gradient, magic wands and layers is practically all you need. The most important thing of all, in my opinion, is to have a clear idea of what you want to do, no matter if it's too close to real coins and banknotes or a more deviant design.

Take as an example the first banknote I ever designed, a 5 aras note:

tumblr_m8iiny8qyX1rd9fsko1_r1_500.png

Not very sophisticated. The use of textures is practically non-existent, since I only used some superimposed geometric patterns (and very simple: distorted lines), but it was a first step. The image is treated as a separate layer with some diminished opacity, to melt it with the background, and the rest is just opaque images (the central vertical strip and the numbers and letters). What took more time and patience was the right strip, which has a pattern of iridescent shapes and numbers, but even that wasn't a pain.
    The next series of banknotes (which I'll do some day...) will be more refined. And so on. It's all about trying to do it, failing at it, and repeating.
? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 51
, Boson, Luxembourg, LUX
message
quoting Izambri, Duke, the Findible League:
quoting Hālian, Atetía @ Central Florida:
Your money is too beautiful for this world, how do you not have a job designing money irl

(Also I've been trying to design Hoennese coinage but drawing a blank as to obverse designs… doesn't help that I can't draw anything more complicated than simple geometric shapes myself, either vector or raster.)

Drawing fantasy money (coins and banknotes) is quite easy once you now where to fish textures and images and how to work with them. In the first case Rhetorica and bloodbath have already pointed out the basic places: Wikimedia Commons, OpenClipart... Doing extensive searchs through Google Images also helps a lot, especially for gradations, uncommon geometric shapes and other textures.

Then working them shouldn't be a big problem: I use Paint.NET, a free software, but more complex things like Gimp or Photoshop are also a possibility. To be honest, you really don't need something very professional, since playing with basic tools like gradient, magic wands and layers is practically all you need. The most important thing of all, in my opinion, is to have a clear idea of what you want to do, no matter if it's too close to real coins and banknotes or a more deviant design.

This is exactly what I recommend: find a good software that you're comfortable using and work with it. Paint.NET is my go-to, but nowadays I use a combination of Inkscape for lettering and some of the text effects and Paint.NET for the actual assembly. Have an idea of what you want to do, but also don't be afraid to try!


quoting Izambri, Duke, the Findible League:
The next series of banknotes (which I'll do some day...) will be more refined. And so on. It's all about trying to do it, failing at it, and repeating.

Bingo. I've been making banknotes for 10+ (!) years, and I've only gotten semi-good at it because of a lot of practice and a lot of designs that looked hideous. Took me about 5 years to get comfortable with the process, and I'm still learning new things.
? Hālian :(
posts: 129
, Alípteza @ Central Florida
message
The major problem for designing Hoennese currency is finding art of Pokémon that is both suitable and available for this use.
? bloodbath Physics Student/Amateur Artist
posts: 51
, Boson, Luxembourg, LUX
message
More money, because OMG MONEY:
oshaharu_foreign_exchange_certificates__
This is playing around some with the Oshaharu language, though with these being more what stupid foreigners use, since the pyew can't legally be exported or converted into foreign currency. So we have some nice foreign exchange certificates (similar to Cuba's peso convertible).
? Rhetorica Your Writing System Sucks
posts: 1258
, Kelatetía: Dis, Major Belt 1
message
Convertible currencies! A perfect example of a nerd-magnetic curiosity, and yet it somehow has evaded any constuff I can think of. Brilliant idea.

I'm afraid I may have some strong opinions about that writing system, though. It's not a good sign when each element in a featural writing system has its own postal code. Maybe try making the vertical and horizontal lines shorter? It's okay as-is for a couple of words, but that is definitely not a font you'd typeset a book in.